Teachers say ‘Lawrence High School is in trouble’ after a series of fights

Security was tight and tensions were high Wednesday at a Massachusetts high school where, for the second day in a row, students were arrested after a fight. Frustrated by the situation, most of the teachers withdrew from Lawrence High School after the end of classes Wednesday. They told NewsCenter 5 that they feel marginalized, insecure and unheard of. “It’s a situation where we can’t work for these kids. More needs to be done in terms of the safety of our students, to make everyone safe,” said Mindy Richardson, a ninth-grade history teacher. The teachers also gave reporters a copy of the letter from their union, which points the finger of blame to the government. “While government officials may point the finger at other board (board receivership boards) or individuals (superintendents), the law is clear that, under national recognition, a child stands before the Commissioner, and is not performing his or her duties,” AFT Lawrence wrote. Witnesses said a total of six fights broke out at Lawrence High School on Tuesday. One of the battles led to the arrest of two female students, police said. Another clash on Wednesday led to another arrest, police said. Students say violence is absurd. “You talk about someone, they hear about it, you know? He thinks so. The common gossip turns out to be a bad argument,” said Elijah Veras, Lawrence’s chief. “I think everyone is just scared because they don’t want to be in a fight or get too arrested afterwards,” said one student. The coalition letter states that the state “has not provided the resources required” to address the problems within the school district. It also says workers feel “frustrated and disrespected” by government officials, resulting in a shortage of teachers. “The country has failed to listen to the voices of teachers, families, students and community groups, treating such people with contempt and disregard for their own interests and in pursuit of what they already know – a plan that has not happened in ten years,” the coalition wrote. To prevent large gatherings, afternoon programs are being organized within the school. Lawrence Mayor Kendrys Vasquez ate with students Wednesday. “We had lunch with the students, you know, to show them that we were there for them. To show them that we care and value the work they are doing in high school,” Vasquez said. “These kids, they want to learn.” The district is committed to providing mental health facilities to reduce instability, as well as police to increase security. After speaking to reporters Wednesday, teachers returned inside the school to plan their next step. Later, during a school board meeting, Superintendent Cynthia Paris said the fight was mainly involving high school students and final students who could not make the usual changes to high school due to the COVID-19 epidemic. He announced his intention to form a working group of athletes to meet the needs of those students.

Security was high and tensions were high Wednesday at a Massachusetts high school where, for the second day in a row, students were arrested after a fight.

Frustrated by the situation, ten more teachers withdrew from Lawrence High School after the end of classes Wednesday. They told NewsCenter 5 that they feel marginalized, insecure and unheard of.

“It’s a situation where we can’t work for these kids. More needs to be done in terms of the safety of our students, to make everyone safe,” said Mindy Richardson, a ninth-grade history teacher.

The teachers also gave reporters a copy of the letter from their union, which points the finger of blame to the government.

“While government officials may point the finger at other board (board receivership boards) or individuals (superintendents), the law is clear that, under national recognition, a child stands before the Commissioner, and is not performing his or her duties,” AFT Lawrence wrote.

Witnesses said a total of six fights broke out at Lawrence High School on Tuesday. One of the battles led to the arrest of two female students, police said.

Another fight Wednesday led to another arrest, police said.

Students say violence is absurd.

“You talk about someone, they hear about it, you know? He thinks so. The common gossip turns out to be a bad argument,” said Elijah Veras, Lawrence’s chief.

“I think everyone is just scared because they don’t want to be in a fight or get too arrested afterwards,” said one student.

The coalition letter says the government “has never provided resources” to address problems in the school district. It also says workers feel “frustrated and disrespected” by government officials, resulting in a shortage of teachers.

“The country has failed to listen to the voices of teachers, families, students and community groups, treating such people with contempt and disregard for their own interests and in pursuit of what they already know – a plan that has not happened in ten years,” the coalition wrote.

To prevent large gatherings, afternoon programs are being organized within the school. Lawrence Mayor Kendrys Vasquez ate with students Wednesday.

“We had lunch with the students, you know, to show them that we were there for them. To show them that we care and value the work they are doing in high school,” Vasquez said. “These kids, they want to learn.”

The district is pledging to provide mental health facilities to address instability, as well as police to increase security.

After speaking to reporters Wednesday, teachers returned inside the school to plan their next step.

Later, during a school board meeting, Superintendent Cynthia Paris said the fight was mainly involving high school students and final students who were unable to make the usual changes to high school due to the COVID-19 epidemic. He announced his intention to create a working group of players to meet the needs of those students.

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