Gabby Petito autopsy: Stiffness can be pre-existing for murder, domestic violence experts say

CHAPTER SOUTH, Fla. – Stiffness can be “a major culprit” in the case of a homicide, as was the case with the 22-year-old deceased Gabby Petito, experts say.

Teton County Coroner Dr. Brent Blue on Tuesday announced that Petito had died of suffocation, weeks after FBI uncovered the remains of a 22-year-old in the Bridger-Teton National Forest, north of Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

“It’s very important to understand that a non-fatal incident is a symptom of a 750% chance of dying at the hands of this perpetrator,” Andrea Wyant told Fox News Digital. Wyant is deputy director of the Hope United Survivor Network, which helps victims of domestic violence and sexual assault.

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Wyant added that financial control and isolation from friends and family “red flags” of relationships go the wrong way.

Mollie Weakland, a specialist and marketing campaigner for the Hope United Survivor Network, said the actual suffocation “is the ultimate form of power and control” for perpetrators who can control a person’s breathing and, thus, survival.

Steven Webb, Ph.D. – a forensic pathologist and law enforcement officer for 11 years – also stated that “any form of seizure, seizure or other means of attempting to control a person is a matter of battery description and must be paid by a state attorney who has such expertise.”

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“Studies show that this type of behavior – in particular, not killing and killing people, increases the risk of becoming involved in atrocities, including murder, as we have seen in this article,” Webb said.

The legislator adds that there are three main symptoms of violence that can occur: the cause of great distress, such as financial issues; testing relationship limits after physical conflict; and the desire to judge someone, Webb said.

More than one in four women who identified themselves as in a relationship with bullying said they had experienced a fatal blow, according to a 2008 study published in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI).

“Research has shown that they have not killed anyone and that violence is a serious risk of death. This points to the importance of the screen.[ing] “with non-lethal beatings and other forms of violence when examining abused women in emergency settings,” Drs. Sabrina Romanoff, Harvard-trained psychiatrist and professor at Yeshiva University in New York City, said.

Shock can also leave “less visible injuries” compared to other violent methods such as punching, said Romanoff, but strangulation can also “lead to vital organs of physical and mental health.”

“While suffocation is a common form of violence against women who experience violence in relationships, it is important to know what it is like to be a violent victim,” Romanoff explained.

BRIAN LAUNDRIE SAW THEY WERE IN THE WYOMING RESTAURANT HOURS UNDER THE NEAR GABBY PETITO WONDERING, EYEWITITES SAY

Lizbeth Meredith, a former domestic violence lawyer and judge now works as a teacher for domestic violence, similarly told Fox News that suffocation “could very well be preceded by murder.”

Meredith, who has been the victim of domestic violence and, in particular, strangled, said the act of violence “is seen as a red flag of a very violent man and is now taken seriously … as a result of the killings.”

“It’s definitely one of the most deadly forces,” he said.

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Petito’s parents reported him missing for eight days before the incident. The 22-year-old was traveling across the country in a Ford transit van with her boyfriend, Brian Laundrie, when he disappeared.

Before he disappeared, Petito and Laundrie posted in August 12 Moab, Utah, pictures of police in the rooms following an incident in which Petito accused himself of beating Laundrie, even telling police that Laundrie had caught him in the face. In a statement to Moabite police about the same incident, a witness described a man – probably Laundrie – beating and beating Petito.

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Laundrie, 23, returned home to North Port, Florida, September 1 in Van without Petito, and her parents filed a report of a man who died on September 11. Laundrie is a person interested in the story, and where she has been unknown for weeks. His parents told him he was missing in North Port, Florida, police August 17.

September 23, that FBI he issued a warrant for Laundrie’s arrest, accusing her of cheating on a bank card. Authorities at the time allegedly used a Capital One anonymous card and identification number to pay or withdraw more than a thousand dollars between August 30 and September 1, at a time when Petito was missing.

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